Month: September 2016

Independent publishers that accept fiction submissions

Looking for a publisher?  Here are some independent publishers that accept submissions of fiction.  Note that for most of these publishers, you first submit a query, synopsis, and sample chapters.  If they are interested, they will ask for the full manuscript.  Some small publishers have started hosting contests with substantial reading fees.  The winner of the contest gets their book published.  I do not recommend this strategy, as odds of publication are low and the fees add up quickly (usually they are at least $25).  The publishers listed below do not have submission fees.

For further research, Poets and Writers has a list of small publishersWriter’s Market (published yearly) is also a helpful resource.

Black Lawrence Press — free open reading period is June 1-June 30

Black Rose Writing

Bronze Man Books

Coffee House Press — watch for their open reading period

Dock Street Press

Dorothy

Educe Press

Hopewell Publications

Insomnia Publishing

Jellyfish Highway (UPDATE 5/4/18: Defunct)

Leapfrog Press (UPDATE 5/1/17: A commenter notes that Leapfrog now charges $33 for fiction submissions, which they’re only accepting through a contest. This is an unfortunate development.  Once again, I don’t think writers should pay to submit to contests, as chances of publication are slim.)

Louisiana State University Press (Yellow Shoe Fiction Series)

Outpost 19

Persea Books

Rescue Press

Tailwinds Press

Twisted Road Publications

Two Dollar Radio ($2.00 fee–I included this since the fee is small)

Vandalia Press (imprint of West Virginia University Press) — reopening for submissions in 2017

Zumaya Publications

Pale Hearts is available October 4th!

My long-anticipated short story collection will be available for sale on Amazon exactly one week from today!  The collection includes 15 stories: some that appeared only in print, a few online favorites, and 5 all-new, never-before-published stories.  In this book, I explore the idea of crime, from the newsworthy (arson, kidnapping) to the everyday (lies, betrayal).  You’ll read about a young girl who poisons her best friend, a college student who steals a classmate’s ring, and a journalist who contacts the girl she once bullied.  What causes these ordinary people to make such bad decisions?  You’ll have to read the book to find out!

paleheartscoverebook-copy

Recommended Reading

Picture of novels on a shelf
Photo source: Morguefile.com

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert–This is a pleasingly ambitious historical novel about the life of a nineteenth-century female botanist.  It seems cliche to use the word “sweeping,” but that really does describe the experience of reading this novel.  It deals with science, love, family, and perhaps most strikingly, female sexuality, all within the context of one woman’s intellectual quest to describe the natural world.

Euphoria by Lily King–This is the story of a love triangle between anthropologists, based loosely on events in Margaret Mead’s life.  King’s writing is gorgeous and the characters are well-realized.  The subject is fascinating, the setting vivid, the plot suspenseful.  All of this ties in for a perfect read!

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark–This lovely short novel somehow captures perfectly a beloved teacher’s influence, positive and negative, on young students.  It’s very difficult for writers to describe such a fleeting, ephemeral thing, yet somehow Spark does it in a way that’s timeless and touching.

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton–This classic is really worth reading.  Wharton is a master of describing the nuances of forbidden love, within the context of wealthy late nineteenth-century New York.  It’s entertaining and heartbreaking and suspenseful all at once.  If you love reading about love, this subtle, beautiful novel is for you!

What did you read this summer?  Post your recommendations in the comments!